Technology Advantage

Fischer-Tropsch, the primary alternative technology for converting natural gas into liquid fuel, was developed in Germany during World War II.

Fischer-Tropsch, the primary alternative technology for converting natural gas into liquid fuel, was developed in Germany during World War II. It is generally used to produce diesel fuel. Both Shell and Sasol have announced plans to build plants in the U.S. having employed this technology in other parts of the world. Fisher-Tropsch facilities, while commercially proven at scale, are typically huge projects that can cost upwards of $20 billion and require a decade or more to develop. The process also produces a wide range of products, some of which have low market demand, which significantly increases the commercial complexity of the project. The high capital costs, marketing complexities and large natural gas requirements make Fisher-Tropsch projects difficult to develop and finance, requiring extensive teams and long development periods.

Considerably smaller in size, our plants can be built for significantly less cost than Fischer-Tropsch facililites and become operational within three years from start of construction. The smaller footprint, more moderate natural gas demand and low emissions profile make G2X Energy gasoline plants easier to site and permit. They are also easier to finance, faster to bring on line and easier to operate. Highly efficient, they produce more saleable product, such as gasoline, than any other commercial process.